Bradley Chubb thinks rookie sack record is “attainable”

Broncos linebacker Bradley Chubb has 12 sacks in his rookie year. He’s only 2.5 sacks from tying Jevon Kearse’s rookie record of 14.5. Chubb thinks he can get there. “Since...

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Steve Kerr: ‘We’re not moving the ball;’ Kevin Durant: ‘We pass the ball too much’

When he took over for Mark Jackson as Golden State coach, Steve Kerr emphasized pace, spacing and ball and player movement offensively. The Warriors’ scoring skyrocketed, and they became the...

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Bradley Chubb

Bradley Chubb thinks rookie sack record is “attainable”

Broncos linebacker Bradley Chubb has 12 sacks in his rookie year. He’s only 2.5 sacks from tying Jevon Kearse’s rookie record of 14.5. Chubb thinks he can get there.

“Since I’m this close, it seems like it’s a goal that is attainable,” Chubb told reporters on Thursday. “I’m just going to go out there and play my game, and if it happens, it happens. But if it doesn’t, it’s cool. At the end of the day, I’m going to try and get it, but I’m not going to force it. I’m going to play pass on every play and stuff like that. It’ll be a great achievement though. Great for me, great for the team, great for everybody. So, it’s something that’s definitely in my sights, but it’s not something I’m going to try and go out of my way to get.”

Kearse set the record as a rookie with the Titans in 1999.

“I’ve recently started doing more research on him,” Chubb said of Kearse. “As I was coming into the NFL and stuff, because a lot of people was telling me about the record and all that, that’s how I knew the number. But I never really watched him play or anything like that — not his rookie year. I watched some of towards the end of his career, but I never really studied or stuff like that.”

Bradley Chubb

Chubb didn’t enter the season expecting to challenge Kearse.

“I never really would’ve actually saw it happening,” Chubb said. “Right now, it’s been all surreal, been a blessing. I’m just trying to maintain as much as I can and just go out there and make plays. Like I said, if it happens, it happens. But if it doesn’t, then it’s all good. I’m still impressed with my season, and this is going to be a lot for next year.”

Chubb and Von Miller have become a potent pair of pass rushers. With Miller’s 14.5 sacks, they have 26.5 between them.

Green Beret Mathew

Trump’s interference in the murder trial of Green Beret Mathew Golsteyn sends the wrong message to U.S. troops

The major facts of the case against Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn are not in dispute: On or about February 22, 2010, Golsteyn killed an Afghan man whom the decorated soldier believed was a member of the Taliban and a bomb maker connected to the deaths of two U.S. Marines two days earlier. And we know this because Major Golsteyn has said so.

In 2015, after an investigation, then-Secretary of the Army John McHugh stripped Golsteyn of his Silver Star, took away his Special Forces tab and gave him an official reprimand. He has now he has been charged with premeditated murder and accused of killing the alleged Taliban member after he was taken into custody.

Because most Americans do not serve in uniform, and even fewer have served in combat, this case is rich with circumstances most will never encounter. For example, why is Golsteyn is being charged with murder when the object of combat being to kill enemy combatants? This feels especially contradictory in the context of a conflict like Afghanistan, where people who appear to be innocent civilians are actually in the business of killing Americans.

Making matters even murkier, President Donald Trump has now weighed in on the matter, promising to review the case and calling Golsteyn a hero on Twitter. Is Trump right? Is Golsteyn a hero being unfairly prosecuted for brutality that is justified in the context of a brutal and unpredictable war?

But killing the enemy is not the only part of that infantry mission statement — you are also, at times, capturing him. It happens more often than most people think, but from time to time enemy soldiers are taken into custody rather than killed, as was the man Golsteyn is being accused of murdering. Sometimes these captives are badly wounded, incapacitated and can’t fight back. Sometimes they just surrender. But at that point, when they are under your control, you inherit responsibility for them and must treat them humanely. Even though captives are among the best sources of intelligence we can encounter, keeping them alive is labor-intensive, burdensome, inconvenient and even tactically dangerous. But you may not just shoot them because it is easier to deal with them that way or you are worried about what they will do if you release them.

Green Beret Mathew

Importantly, this principle remains true even in unconventional wars, when we are confronted with an enemy that is stealthy, wily and concealed among the population whose allegiance we are trying to win. It is not just being stodgy and inflexible to assert that, if nations are to succeed in armed combat over the duration of a campaign, individual soldiers may not make up their own rules.

What’s next? An Article 32 investigation. It is the military equivalent of a grand jury hearing — except that Major Golsteyn can be represented by counsel and can cross-examine witnesses, two rights civilians do not enjoy in all but a few jurisdictions. Personal experience with the Uniform Code of Military Justice says that military people are typically sensitive to the difficult choices that combat soldiers must make in the heat of battle. But they are also sensitive to the logic, strategic importance and societal strength of having rules that govern behavior in the most difficult situations.

There are, of course, disadvantages to being — as the cliche goes — a nation of laws rather than a nation of men. But it is something of an irony that, if we fight wars without adhering to rules we establish, we are subjecting ourselves to the grossest inhumanity of our adversaries and the regrets of our consciences.

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